The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

We are all well, and join in Love to you and yours. I am ever Your affectionate Brother B FRANKLIN


"Indeed a Lowly Dweling"

[Printed first, and hitherto only, in Duane, Letters to Benjamin Franklin, pp. 159-160; here printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society.]

MY DEAR BROTHER Boston August 16 1787

I cant Express to you the Pleasure it gives me on reading yr Description of yr Building. I Rejoice that you have got thorough so much to your Satisfaction, that God has blesd you in that Respect is mater of thankfullnes as all the blesings God Afords us are, for none can Ascribe merit to them selves, yet as the Riteous has the Promis of this Life and that which is to come; if we may Judge of the fittnes of things we may Surely Expect won who has Imployd His whol Life to Defuse Happines to all the world has a Right to live in a comodious House, and that all about Him should combine to Promot His Happines. our Grat Benefactor delights to Bless those that trust in Him, which I am sure you do, and you conferm me in that Judgment as you say you beg the continuance of his favours but shuld submit to his will should a Reverse be determinied, in that disposition of mind you are happier than you could be in all that the world could give without it. Let us my Dear Brother goo beging and we Shall certainly be Reciveing, all that is best for us till we come to the full Injoiment in our Fathers Habitation.

It was Indeed a Lowly Dweling we were brought up in but we were fed Plentifully, made comfortable with Fire and cloathing, had sildom any contention among us, but all was Harmony: Especially betwen the Heads--and they were Universally Respected, & the most of the Famely in good Reputation, this is still happier liveing than multituds Injoy.

Blessed be God that you & I by your means have the Addition of more Pleasing apearance in our Dwellings.

-296-

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