The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Carl Van Doren; Benjamin Franklin et al. | Go to book overview

"A Soport when flesh & hart Fails"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. Franklin's letter of August 31, now missing, had been advertised by the Boston post office as uncalled for, but Jane Mecom had not seen the notice and did not know of it till she was told by some "won who came out of the country."]

Boston Nov. 21--1788

MY DEAR BROTHER

I did not recve the Leter Dated Aug 31 you wrote me when John williams was at Philadela till the Day befor yester Day, I then heard of its being Advertizd on the List in the Newspaper by won who came out of the country but had I recd it Emediatly as it happened I sopose things would have remand Jeust as they are, for I had Drawn the Bill & Got in the wood a Day or two before He came Home he knowing that I have heard nothing more about it. I have alreddy wrot you concerning it But Prehaps you do not git all I write.

your Grevious fit of Sicknes has distresd me but alas I can do nothing to Aleviate it all I can do is to wish and Pray for your Returning Health & that you may at all times have the Spirit of God comforting & Sustaining You, that will be a Soport when flesh & hart Fails.

I and my Famely are as Useal Jogging on in the old Track Remember me Affectionatly to all that Love and comfort you & Long may you feal the Influence of such Blessings Prays yr Sister

JANE, MECOM

by Capt. Young


"My way of telling the story"

[Printed in part in W. T. Franklin edition of his grandfather's Private Correspondence, pp. 115-116, and first in full, from a manuscript now missing, in Sparks, Works, X, 366-367, from which it is here reprinted. That Franklin wrote almost no letters through July, August, September, and the first three weeks of October can be accounted for by the fact that, at least from August on, he was writing the third, and longest, part of his Memoirs, or Autobiography, about which on October 24 he

-318-

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