The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

"Something to wean us from this World"

[Printed first, and hitherto only, in the New England Historical and Genealogical Register, XXVII ( 1873), 250, from a fragment copied from the original by Josiah Flagg and now in the New England Historic Genealogical Society.]

Philadelphia July 1 1789.

As to the Pain I suffer, about which you make yourself so unhappy, it is, when compared with the long Life I have enjoyed of Health & Ease, but a Trifle.

And it is right that we should meet with Something to wean us from this World and make us willing, when called, to leave it:

Otherwise the parting would indeed be grievous I am ever

Your affect Brother B. F.


"At the back of the north Church"

[Here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. It appears that Franklin's letters sent in care of Jonathan Williams Sr. were more likely to be delivered than those addressed merely to Unity Street. What Jane Mecom here calls the "north Church" was the Episcopal Christ Church which faced Salem Street with its back toward Unity Street; and is not to be confused with the Congregational Second Church, or Old North, which after the destruction of its meeting house by the British for firewood during the occupation had been merged with the congregation of the New Brick Church in Hanover Street, under the pastorate of John Lathrop and with the name Second Church. The Massachusetts Centinel for July 22, 1789, had a death notice which read: "In this town, Mrs. Susannah Hubbart." No notice has been found of the death of a Mrs. "Larrabe," but she is presumed to have been related to the Abigail Larrabee who was a member of the Second Church and who appears in the Boston Directory for 1796 as "huckster, Unity Street." The "Grat Grand Daughter" mentioned in the postscript was Sarah Flagg Greene's daughter Sarah, and the "Grand Daughter" was Benjamin Mecom's daughter Jane.]

Boston July 23--1789

DEAR BROTHER

I recd yrs Dated 1st of the month on the 19 was much Rejoycd to see yr hand writing & that you Retain such Fortitude

-323-

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