The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

he ventured to relate it as a Fact, that I had with those Ministers solicited him to enter into the American Service.--A Translation of that Book into French has since been printed, but the Translator has omitted that pretended Fact, probably from an Apprehension that its being, in that Country, known not to be true, might hurt the Credit & Sale of the Translation.

I thank you for the Sermon on sacred Music; I have read it with Pleasure--I think it a very ingenious Composition. You will say this is natural enough, if you read what I have formerly written on the same Subject in one of my printed Letters, wherein you will find a perfect Agreement of Sentiment, respecting the complex Music, of late, in my Opinion, too much in vogue, it being only pleasing to learned Ears, who can be delighted with the Difficulty of Execution, instead of simple Harmony and Melody.

The Loss of my Letter to Mrs. Greene is not very great, as I could send you one of our Press Copies, if you were desirous of seeing it.

This Family joins in best Wishes to you & yours, with

Your affectionate Brother

[signature missing]


"This Day my Dear Brother compleats his 84th year"

[Printed first, and hitherto only, in Duane, Letters to Benjamin Franklin, pp. 179-180. Here printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society.]

Boston Janr 17--1790

This Day my Dear Brother compleats his 84th year you can not as old Jacob say few and Evel have they been, Exept those wherin you have Endured such Grevious Torments Laterly, yours have been filld with Enumerable Good works, Benifits to your felow creaturs, & Thankfulnes to God; that notwithstanding the Distressing circumstance before mentioned, yours must

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