The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

be Esteemed a Glorious life, Grat Increece of Glory & Happines I hope Await you, may God mitigate your Pain & continue yr Patience yet many years for who that Know & Love you can Bare the thoughts of Serviving you in this Gloomy world.

I Esteem it very Fortunet that cousin John willims is Returning to Philadelphia again & will take a Keg of souns & Toungs by Land as there is no vesel Likly to go till march I have Tasted them & think them very Good shall as long as they are Aceptable send you fresh & fresh as I have opertunity.

I am as you sopose six years younger than you Are being Born on the 27th March 1712 but to Apearance in Every wons sight as much older.

we have Hitherto a very moderat Winter but I do not Atempt to go abroad my Breath but Just Serves me to go about the House without Grate Pain & as I am comfortable at Home I strive to be content.

Remember my Love to your children

from yr Affectionat Sister

JANE MECOM


"I am as Ever your Affectionat Sister"

[This last surviving letter from Jane Mecom to her brother is here first printed from the manuscript in the American Philosophical Society. Since Franklin's letter of January 29 is missing, it is not clear what "the Performance of my Nephey William" was.]

Boston febr 6--1790

DEAR BROTHER

The winter has been so moderate that my Neibour Capt Rich is going to take a Trip to Philadelphia a month sooner than he Expected. I would not Neglect the opertunity to Inform you I have been & am as well as Useal, that I wrot by cousen John Williams the 17th of Janr & sent a Keg of Toung, which I hope you have recd & find agreable I do not send any by Capt Rich because there is none to be had but the verry same & it may be by Next trip I may be able to Procure some Newly come in.

-338-

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