The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

I hope to hear when Cousen williams Returns that you have not been worse & that you still keep up your Spirits

I am as Ever your Affectionat Sister

JANE MECOM

I had Just finshed my Leter to go by my Neibour to morrow when Mr John williams sent me yours of Janr 29 I was very Sure there was Danger of yr being disgusted with the quantity I sent but was over ruldd but determined not to send more at a time for the future than you mentioned, I hope how you have been able to Regale on them more than wonce as I beleve they are so throwly Preserved they will Reman sweet all the cool wether. I Bless God for all the Intervales of Ease you have & am your

Affectionat Sister

J M

I am Pleasd with the Performance of my Nephey William it Looks to me to be Accuratly Done must have taken a grat Deal of time & is worth Preserveing haveing Just Recved it I have not had the Pleasure of Shewing it to beter Judges.

[Apparently in Jane Collas's handwriting] Mrs Collas desires her duty to you and love to Mrs Bach


"Quite free from pain"

[Printed first, from a manuscript now missing, in Sparks, Works, x, 425-426, from which it is here reprinted. In the three weeks free from pain of which Franklin spoke he had written his famous letter about his religious beliefs to Ezra Stiles, on March 9, and on March 23 the spirited and witty parody On the Slave-Trade which was published in The Federal Gazette in Philadelphia on March 25. Since the manuscript is missing, it is not clear what Franklin meant by "the crooked lines"; but the last thirteen lines of the original manuscript of his Memoirs, as he always called his Autobiography, slant upward toward the right as if he might have been writing them too in bed. After this letter to Jane Mecom, Franklin is known to have written only one other, that to Thomas Jefferson of April 8. He died on April 17. His sister Lydia,

-339-

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