The Letters of Benjamin Franklin & Jane Mecom

By Benjamin Franklin; Jane Mecom et al. | Go to book overview

good deal but it seems He has Proved that the Aple that Eve Eate was not the only mischevious won the Earth was to bare, I sopose he has tould you as He wrote me that with the mis youse of a Tempting Aple my Leter to you was Distroyd, I have forgot what it containd but should be very glad to know in a Line by Post if Mr Bache reed that I wrote to Him and also beg the Favouer of Him to write me a Proper form of Adress to my Brothers Executers when I shall have ocation next month & how I Shall Direct to them for I have not a Soul to confer with on such an ocation,--

I hear my Dear Brothers will is Printed. I wish you would send me won of them when you send me Miss Betseys Picter I have not Given up that yet, I Expected to Recve it by cousen John Williams as He came by water, He has sent me won of my. Nepheu Benjamins Daly Papers it Apears to me very Respectable if his Wensdays Paper fills Equaly it may soon create for him an Estate in the clouds as his Venerable Grandfather usd to say of His Newspaper Debpts, my Daughter Joyns me in Affectionat Respects to you Mr Bache & children

with yr Affectionat Aunt

JANE MECOM


Jane Mecom: Conveyance

[Here first printed from the manuscript, in a legal hand, in the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Franklin had bequeathed his sister fifty pounds a year in his original will of July 17, 1788, and then had increased the annuity to sixty pounds in the codicil of June 23, 1789. The Boston Directory for 1789 gives the address of "Gardner Joseph, Esq; justice" as Bennet Street, which was in Jane Mecom's neighborhood. Gamaliel Larrabee was presumably related to the Abigail Larrabee who is listed as "huckster, Unity Street" in the Boston Directory for 1796.]

Whereas by the last Will and Testament of my late Brother Benjamin Franklin deceased, an Annuity of Sixty Pounds Sterling, is devised to me during my natural Life, payable out of the Interest or Dividends annually arising from twelve Shares of Bank Stock, which he held at the time of his death in the Bank

-344-

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