Arms and the Woman: War, Gender, and Literary Representation

By Helen M. Cooper; Adrienne Auslander Munich et al. | Go to book overview
42.
Sarah Jane Graham Sams Journal, Feb. 3-Mar. 25, 1865.
43.
Jones, When Sherman Came, 166; Miers, When the World Ended, 58-59; Ellis, "The Flight of the Clan," Feb. 25, 1865.
44.
Jones, Heroines of Dixie, 371.
45.
Bryce, "Personal Experiences,"51.

Geographical Distribution of Sources
Lucy Johnston Ambler, Morven, Virginia
Grace Pierson James Beard, Columbia, South Carolina
Mrs. Campbell Bryce, Columbia, South Carolina
Katherine Couse, Spottsylvania County, Virginia
Julia Davidson, Atlanta, Georgia
Emily Caroline Ellis, Columbia and Camden, South Carolina
Grace Elmore, Columbia, South Carolina
Emily Geiger Goodlett, Columbia, South Carolina
Sally Hawthorne, Fayetteville, North Carolina
Maria L. Haynsworth, Camden, South Carolina
L. F. J., Sandersville, Georgia
Mae Jett, Atlanta, Georgia
Floride Cantey Johnson, Camden, South Carolina
Cornelia Peake McDonald, Winchester, Virginia
Emma Lydia Rankin, McDowell County, North Carolina
Sue Richardson, Front Royal, Virginia
Kate Whitehead Rowland, Macon, Georgia
Sarah Jane Graham Sams, Barnwell, South Carolina
Harriet Hyrne Simons, Columbia, South Carolina
Sophie Sosnowski, Columbia, South Carolina
Sarah and Robena Tillinghast, Fayetteville, North Carolina

Works Cited

Ambler, Lucy Johnston. Diary. Manuscripts, Acc. # 5191. Alderman Library, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia.

Barrett, John G. Sherman's March through the Carolinas. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1956.

Beard, Grace Pierson James. "A Series of True Incidents Connected with Sherman's March to the Sea." Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Bryan, T. Conn. "A Georgia Woman's Civil War Diary: The Journal of Minerva Leah Rowles McClatchey, 1864-65." Georgia Historical Quarterly 15, no. 2 ( 1967): 197-216.

-77-

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Arms and the Woman: War, Gender, and Literary Representation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Notes xix
  • War and Memory 1
  • Arms and the Woman: The Con[tra]ception of the War Text 9
  • Notes 23
  • Works Cited 23
  • "Still Wars and Lechery": Shakespeare and the Last Trojan Woman 25
  • Notes 39
  • Works Cited 40
  • Rewriting History: Madame de Villedieu and the Wars of Religion 43
  • Notes 55
  • Works Cited 57
  • Southern Women's Diaries of Sherman's March to the Sea, 1864-1865 59
  • Notes 75
  • Works Cited 77
  • Civil Wars and Sexual Territories 80
  • Notes 95
  • Works Cited 96
  • The Women and Men of 1914 97
  • Notes 118
  • Corpus/Corps/Corpse: Writing the Body in/at War 124
  • Notes 159
  • Works Cited 164
  • May Sinclair's The Tree of Heaven: The Vortex of Feminism, the Community of War 168
  • Notes 179
  • Works Cited 182
  • Combat Envy and Survivor Guilt: Willa Cather's "Manly Battle Yarn" 184
  • Notes 201
  • Works Cited 203
  • "Seeds for the Sowing": The Diary of Käthe Kollwitz 205
  • Notes 221
  • Works Cited 223
  • A Needle with Mama's Voice: Mitsuye Yamada's Camp Notes and the American Canon of War Poetry 225
  • Notes 241
  • Feminism, the Great War, and Modern Vegetarianism 244
  • Images of Love and War in Contemporary Israeli Fiction: A Feminist Re-vision 268
  • Notes 277
  • Works Cited 280
  • Nuclear Domesticity: Sequence and Survival 283
  • Notes 299
  • "Epitaphs and Epigraphs: 'The End(s) of Man'" 303
  • Notes 319
  • Works Cited 321
  • A Bibliography of Secondary Sources 323
  • The Contributors 331
  • Index 335
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