White Servitude in Colonial South Carolina

By Warren B. Smith | Go to book overview

APPENDIX III
Statistics on Population, Importation of Negro Slaves and Exportation of Rice

Since rice and negro slaves played such a dominant part in the development of the tide-water region, statistics relative to each commodity offer an almost yearly index to the evolution of South Carolina as a colony and as a State.

In the early days, negroes were brought in a few at a time, as were the white servants. The Warrants for Land Grants ( 1692-1711) note on 55 to 92 grants for the immigrant, his servants and his slaves. The number of the latter varies from one to twelve.

The first comprehensive approach to a census appears under date of September 17th, 1708, when Richard Beresford, one of the agents for the colony, reported that there were:

1,360free white men
900free white women
60white servant men
60white servant women
1,700free white children, a total white population of 4,080.
1,800negro men slaves
1,100negro women slaves
1,200Negro children slaves, a total of negro slave--4,100.
500Indian men slaves
600Indian women slaves
300Indian children slaves, a total of Indian slaves--1,400.
Total population9,580.1

Governor Johnson reported ( Jan. 12th, 1719-20): "Tis computed by the Muster Roles & other Observations that at present we may have about 1,600 Fighting men--Computacon of 4 Persons in each Family, the whole of the Whites are 6,400."2 Feb. 22d,

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