China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

12
Letter to Poor and Lower-Middle Peasants and Cadres at All Levels in Rural People's Communes All Over the Country

CCP Central Committee

Source: Peking Review, No. 9, 1967, p. 6. Circulated on 20 February 1967 as Central Document Zhongfa [ 1967] 58.

Poor and Lower-Middle Peasant Comrades!

Comrade Cadres Doing Rural Work:

The poor and lower-middle peasants are the main force taking firm hold of the revolution and promoting production in the countryside. At the start of the present spring cultivation, Chairman Mao and the Party's Central Committee call on you to take firm hold of the revolution and promote production conscientiously, mobilize all forces, and set to immediately to get the spring cultivation done well.

Cadres at all levels in the rural people's communes must be good at consulting with the poor and lower-middle peasants and all the laboring masses to get an upsurge going in spring cultivation.

The Party's Central Committee believes that the overwhelming majority of cadres at all levels in the rural people's communes are good or comparatively good. Those comrades who have made mistakes should also work hard in the spring cultivation so as to make amends by good deeds for their mistakes. As long as cadres who have made mistakes act in this way, the poor and lower-middle peasants should show understanding and support them in their work. The attitude to be taken in criticizing them must be that of "learning from past mistakes to avoid future ones and curing the sickness to save the patient," which Chairman Mao has always taught.

Landlords, rich-peasants, counter-revolutionaries, bad elements, and Rightists are categorically not permitted to be unruly in word or deed, to sabotage production or the unity among the working people, or to incite factional disputes. They must diligently continue to reform themselves through labor under the supervision of the poor and lower- middle peasants.

-58-

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