China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

19
"Annihilate Every Renegade"

Nankai University "Weidong" Red Guards

Source: Excerpt from The History of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution at Nankai University, Writing Group of the Red Guard Nankai University "Weidong" Red Guards Congress , ed., Tiafan difu kai er kang--Ji Nankai daxue wuchanjieji wenhua dageming (Heaven and earth are moved with emotion--a record of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution at Nankai University) ( Tianjin: Nankai daxue "Weidong" hongweibing zongbu zhengzhibu, 1968), pp. 173-78.

On August 5, 1966, our greatest leader, Chairman Mao, wrote a great historical document that would come to be known throughout the world for its tremendous power, namely, the article "Bombard the Headquarters: My First Big-Character Poster."1

"Bombard the Headquarters!" That was the key salvo, the shot that led to the complete and thorough burying of the bourgeois headquarters headed by Liu Shaoqi, China's Khrushchev! It was the shot that shook up the whole world! It was a salvo that opened up a whole new chapter in human history! It was in the noise of this earthshaking shot that the conspiratorial clique of Liu Shaoqi, that big renegade and traitor who has hidden himself inside the Party for as long as thirty years, was exposed!

The document Zhongfa [ 1967] 96, printed and distributed by the Office of the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party, clearly points out:

In August, 1966, after Chairman Mao wrote the big-character poster, "Bombard the Headquarters" at the Eleventh Plenum of the Eighth Central Committee, we, in accordance with the directives of Comrade Kang Sheng, launched an investigation into the issue of how Bo Yibo, Liu Lantao, An Ziwen, Yang Xianzheii, et al., had been able to get out of prison by way of so-called "simple procedures." We investigated and read all the newspapers that were published in Beiping at the time,

____________________
1
English translation in Current Background, no. 891, 8 October 1969, p. 63.

-95-

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