China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

23
Rebels in Shanghai

Far Eastern Economic Review Correspondent

Source: Far Eastern Economic Review, 8 September 1966, pp. 443-45.

The second half of July and the first three weeks of August were extremely hot in Shanghai--but there were no school holidays this summer for those over sixteen. The students and the teachers stayed on, either living in or attending school every day in order to acquire the thinking of Mao Zedong and to conduct the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution.

The initial stage of the revolution took place indoors: in colleges and schools, in industrial and commercial enterprises, and in various organizations. Students, workers, and other employees concentrated on criticizing and denouncing all those thought to be guilty of anti-Party leanings or unstable in their political thinking. Only after this stage were the student activities transferred outdoors to sweep over the whole city. Day after day, ever since 10 August, the sounds of drums, gongs, slogans, and songs have filled the air as columns of matchers have marched down the streets in unending processions, all heading toward the local headquarters of the Chinese Communist Party.

The first demonstration by students, workers and groups of residents was to greet the promulgation of the Sixteen-Point Resolution of the Central Committee on the Cultural Revolution.1 The second was to greet the Communique of the Committee's Eleventh Plenary Session.2 Then, third, people filled the streets to implement the decisions and to eradicate from the city all remnants of the bourgeois way of life, all traces of the former reactionary regimes, all vestiges of imperialism, feudalism, colonialism, and other objectionable isms.

Between 10 and 21 August the revolution was marked mainly by orderly processions, each group carrying the national flag, numerous portraits of Mao Zedong, red banners and paper flags with slogans, and

____________________
1
Document 4.
2
An English translation is in Peking Review, No. 34, 1966.

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 406

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.