China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

I now demand:

If you don't let me go to the Center tomorrow, I swear to die.

You can have someone tail me, but you have no right whatsoever to restrict my movement.

If you don't respond, I will begin a hunger strike at six A.M. on 5 July 1966 to protest this illegal political persecution!

Kuai Dafu 11 P.M., 4 July 1966


26
"I Saw Chairman Mao!!!"

Bei Guancheng

Source: This letter from a twenty-six-year-old teacher to his colleagues in the Jianguang Junior Middle School in Shanghai was published by the New Beijing University "Smile Mingling in Their Midst" Combat Team in Jianguang zhongxue qingnian jiaoshi Bei Guancheng shi zemyang bei bisi de?--"Bei Guancheng shijian" diaocha baogao (How Was the Young Teacher Bei Guancheng from Jianguang Middle School Forced to Die?--Report of an Investigation into the "Bei Guancheng Incident ") ( Shanghai, 1967), p. 6.

Comrades:

Let me tell you the great news, news greater than heaven. At five minutes past seven in the evening on the 15th of September 1966, I saw our most most most most dearly beloved leader Chairman Mao! Comrades, I have seen Chairman Mao! Today I am so happy my heart is about to burst. We're shouting "Long live Chairman Mao! Long live! Long live!" We're jumping! We're singing! After seeing the Red Sun in Our Hearts, I just ran around like crazy all over Beijing. I so much wanted to tell everyone the great news! I wanted everyone to join me in being happy, jumping, and shouting.

It was like this: Last night I knew that today Chairman Mao would receive the teachers and students who had come to Beijing, and so this afternoon I pleaded over and over again with the pickets to let me pass. I figured they never would, so I really did not make that much of an

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