China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

Please, with the people of China in mind, think about it: In what direction are you taking China?

The Great Cultural Revolution is not a mass movement, but one man moving the masses with the barrel of a gun.

I solemnly declare: On this day, I withdraw from the Communist Youth League of China.

Respectfully,

Wang Rongfen 4th Grade 1st Class German Language Major Department of East-European Languages Beijing Foreign Languages Institute 24 September 1966


28
Proletarian Dictatorship and Proletarian Extensive Democracy

Tan Houlan

Source: Red Flag, No. 2, 1967, pp. 37-39. The twenty-six-year-old author is a cadre-turned-student at Beijing Teacher's University and leader of the "Mao Zedong Thought Red Guards, 'Jinggangshan' Combat Regiment." The article was most probably written by her ghostwriter and teacher in the Department of Chinese Language and Literature, Ms. Li Shaoming.

"Thousands of willows sway in the spring breeze; all the 600 million people of the divine country are Shun or Yao."1

In this thunderous and heroic Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, millions of revolutionary masses in our great country have for the first time come to enjoy an extensive democracy without precedent in human history. The revolutionary people enjoy the democracy of free

____________________
1
Lines quoted from Mao Zedong's poem "Saying Good-bye to the God of Disease (2)" ( July 1958). "Shun" and "Yao" were semilegendary model emperors, said to have ruled China around 2200 B.C., praised by Confucianists for their exemplary virtue.

-150-

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