China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview
task of educating the young and to help schools and residential areas to organize the education of the young outside school hours, so as to truly foster the young to become all-round developed communist new men with a proletarian political consciousness.

Heilongjiang Provincial Revolutionary Committee Political Commission Culture and Education Group 13 April 1967


35
I Support My Child in Taking the Revolutionary Road

Qu Guishan

Source: Survey of China Mainland Magazines, No. 654, 12 May 1969. This letter from an employee in the East Is Red Garment Factory in Beijing originally appeared in Beijing ribao ( Beijing Daily) on 21 July 1968.

My son, Qu Che, is a senior middle school graduate from the No. 25 Middle School in Peking. In October last year when ten graduates, including my son, decided to go to Inner Mongolia to set up their homes, I gave them my full support without saying anything. I thought, Chairman Mao had long ago pointed out: "How should we judge whether a youth is a revolutionary? How can we tell? There can be only one criterion, namely, whether or not he is willing to integrate himself with the broad masses of workers and peasants and does so in practice. If he is willing to do so and actually does so, he is a revolutionary; otherwise, he is a nonrevolutionary or a counter-revolutionary."

What an impressive teaching of Chairman Mao! The road my son is taking is a road pointed out by Chairman Mao, a revolutionary road, a road for the prevention of revisionism. Being the father, I naturally gave him 100 percent support.

Going to Inner Mongolia to work, one must expect some hardship. And it is precisely because my son is willing to go to a place of hardship that I feel particularly happy. Chairman Mao said: "A good comrade is one who goes to the most difficult place." What attitude one takes toward hardship is an important indication of whether one is

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