China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

revolution and socialist construction, the working class--the class that leads the revolution--has made earth-shaking achievements.

Today, guided by Chairman Mao's latest brilliant directive: "The working class must exercise leadership in everything," and striving for complete victory in the Cultural Revolution, our great working class has militantly, and with proletarian fearlessness, brought into full play its spirit of carrying the revolution through to the end. It is striding on to the political stage of struggle, criticism, and transformation in all aspects of the superstructure. What a magnificent scene!

Let us hold high the red lantern of revolution and victoriously advance!


48
Unveiling the Dark Side of the Chinese Department's Program in Classical Studies

Students in the Department of Language and Literature at Beijing University

Source: Chinese Sociology and Anthropology: A Journal of Translations, Vol. 2, No. 1-2, Fall-Winter 1969/70, pp. 77-88. Revised translation by H. Y. Cheng.

Liu Shaoqi, the biggest Party-person in power taking the capitalist road, has always been fighting against Chairman Mao on the educational front and stubbornly promoted the counter-revolutionary revisionist educational line in order to train successors to the bourgeoisie. To achieve their evil aims, the bourgeoisie used all possible ways and means to weaken and poison our youth in an attempt to convert us into tame instruments for the restoration of capitalism.

The Classical Literature Professional Program in the Department of Chinese Language and Literature in Beijing University is really a "black shop," especially set up to poison our youth by a handful of counter-revolutionary revisionists from the former Central Propaganda Department, the former Ministry of Culture, and the former Beijing Municipal Party Committee, under the direction of Liu Shaoqi.

-233-

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