China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

mass movement in Europe and North America. Armed with Mao Zedong's thought, the 700 million Chinese people stand firmly on the side of the revolutionary people of Europe and North America. We believe that in their burning struggle, the working class, the peasants, progressive youth, and all revolutionary masses will continuously temper themselves, raise their political consciousness, strengthen their unity, and expand their own forces. We believe that provided the working class and the broad masses of the people of Europe and North America unite with the revolutionary people of the whole world and persevere in courageous and sustained battle, the system of capitalism and imperialism will surely be buried.


56
"Is China Almost Like a Dead Society?"

United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations

Source: Excerpts from China and the United States: Today and Yesterday, a transcript of hearings before the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, 92nd Congress, 2nd Session, on "China Today and the Course of Sino- U.S. Relations over the Past Few Decades" ( Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1972), pp. 45-57. The chairman is Senator J.W. Fulbright, and witnesses are John S. Service and Raymond P. Ludden, two former Foreign Service officers and members of the American "Dixie Mission" to the CCP headquarters in Yan'an in 1945, and Warren I. Cohen, professor of diplomatic history at Michigan State University.


Are Present Conditions in China Threatening?

THE CHAIRMAN: Do any of you feel that present conditions in China, which you have reported, constitute a threat to the United States? They are very different. Granted it is a different approach from our own.

Do any of you feel this is something we should be deeply concerned about? I would like you and also Mr. Service particularly, to answer. Do you feel what is going on in China is a threatening thing and that we ought to be deeply concerned about it?

MR. SERVICE: I don't believe it threatens the United States. No. I don't believe China is a threat to the United States.

-276-

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