China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party

By Michael Schoenhals | Go to book overview

Chronology*

1965

November: Mao Zedong prepares the ground for what will be called the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution by having the young literary critic Yao Wenyuan attack a play by Beijing's vice mayor, Wu Han, in a Shanghai newspaper; by replacing the director of the Central Committee General Office, Yang Shangkun, with his own trusted lieutenant and chief bodyguard, Wang Dongxing; and by taking steps, together with Lin Biao, toward removing PLA Chief of Staff Luo Ruiqing from his post. Mao leaves Beijing for east China, citing security concerns as one of the reasons for his departure from the capital.

December: Luo Ruiqing is purged at an enlarged Politburo meeting in Shanghai, chaired by Mao. In Beijing, Mayor Peng Zhen (concurrent head of the Party's ad hoc group of five in charge of culture) tries to protect his deputy Wu Han by insisting that any "mistakes" he may have committed are purely academic. Wu Han publishes a self-criticism, and Mao agrees to postpone the passing of a political verdict on him by two months. The Central Propaganda Department restricts media debate to historical and literary matters.

____________________
*
The sources consulted in the preparation of this chronology include: Wang Nianyi , Da dongluan de niandai (Years of Great Turmoil) ( Zhengzhou: Henan renmin chubanshe, 1988); Ma Qibin et al., eds., Zhongguo gongchandang zhizheng sishi nian 1949-1989 (The CCP Forty Years in Power 1949-1989) ( Beijing: Zhonggong dangshi ziliao chubanshe, 1989); "Beijing shi 'Wenhua dageming' dashiji (Record of Major Events in the Great Cultural Revolution" in Beijing Municipality), serialized in extra issues of Beijing dangshi ziliao tongxun (Beijing Party History Materials Newsletter), 1987; Tianfan difu kai er kang-- Wuchanjieji wenhua dageming dashiji (Heaven and Earth are Moved with Emotion--Record of Major Events in the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution), revised ed. ( Beijing: Beijing dizhi xueyuan, 1967).

-361-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
China's Cultural Revolution, 1966-1969: Not a Dinner Party
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 406

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.