The Soviet Union: Background, Ideology, Reality

By Waldemar Gurian; Michael Karpovich et al. | Go to book overview

The Development of the Soviet Regime: From Lenin to Stalin

WALDEMAR GURIAN

The most striking peculiarity of the Soviet regime, established in Russia more than thirty years ago, is its claim to be the instrument of a necessary historical and social development. It regards itself as the accelerator of the evolution of mankind towards socialism and communism. The details of this evolution are unknown -- but its general direction is known to the party, the Bolshevist-Communist party of Lenin and of his successor, Stalin. The official Soviet textbook, spread in millions of copies, the History of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union ( New York: International Publishers, 1939) states:

The power of the Marxist-Leninist theory lies in the fact that it enables the Party to find the right orientation in any situation, to understand the inner connection of current events, to foresee their course and to perceive not only how and in what direction they are developing in the present, but how and in what direction they are bound to develop in the future.1 (p. 355).

Therefore, the Marxist-Leninist doctrine determining Soviet policies is not only a theory, but the basis for a practice carried out by an organization. This organization, the party, determines which steps are right and correspond to the demands of the situation. For the socialistic-communist aim will not be accomplished at once and easily; it will be realized by difficult and complicated struggles whose direction requires incessant maneuvering, constant observation of existing power conditions, and careful consideration of the degree of maturity reached in the advance towards the goal.

The party is regarded as the infallible guide of practical politics because all its actions are based upon the sole right and true doctrine,

____________________
1
The History of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union is today officially ascribed to Stalin.

-1-

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