Women, International Development, and Politics: The Bureaucratic Mire

By Kathleen Staudt | Go to book overview

List of Contributors

Sonia E. Alvarez is Associate Professor of Politics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is the author of Engendering Democracy in Brazil: Women's Movements in Transition Politics ( Princeton 1990) and co-editor of The Making of Social Movements in Latin America: Identity, Strategy, and Democracy with Arturo Escobar ( Westview 1992) and Cultures of Politics/Politics of Cultures: Revisioning Latin American Social Movements with Evelina Dagnino and Arturo Escobar ( Westview 1997). Alvarez's current research centers on the challenges to democratic theory and practice posed by the (re)configuration of national and transnational civil society.

Sally Baden is a socio-economist specializing in gender and development issues. She manages a briefing service for development agencies on gender and development (BRIDGE) at the Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex. She has worked on gender analysis of economic reform policies and processes, with particular reference to sub-Saharan Africa, as well as on gender issues in poverty and employment. She has also prepared a range of country gender profiles, sector reviews, and other reports aimed at the development of gender-sensitive policies and programs and the institutionalization of gender concerns in development agencies.

Alice Carloni lives in Rome and has consulted for various international development agencies. Carloni is a rural sociologist at the Investment Center of the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization. The center provides technical support to international financing institutions such as the World Bank, the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), and the regional development banks.

Anne Marie Goetz is a Fellow (sic) of the Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex. She is a feminist political scientist and her research focuses on the politics of gender in development institutions. She has studied

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