Grand Man: Memories of Norman Douglas

By Nancy Cunard | Go to book overview

2
The Tunisian Journey

WHICH of us suggested it to the other, that Tunisian journey we took together in April, 1938? I cannot even remember! We were quick to start as soon as it had been decided and, despite so much that has happened since, it all persists in seeming not so very long ago . . . Your fifth trip there, you told me, when I came to fetch you in Vence.

This rather gay, and, on the whole, beautiful little hill-town, was perforce a new home to you. It could not and it did not replace Florence and you wanted to think of it only as a temporary stage until the legal discussions going on in Italy had been satisfactorily terminated--if such were to be the case. The lawyer was writing you even now, asking why you did not return, but the whole atmosphere there was too unpleasant; there ought to be a guarantee that you would not be bothered, once you went back.

Some congenial people lived in Vence, one of them being "Auntie". This old English appellation made me laugh a good deal and it suited her admirably. First spoken of by you with one of those non-committal shakes of the head, Martha Gordon Crotch (or, as you dubbed her, "Martha of Hartlepool, the incorrigible puritan") was by then a regular institution there, with her souvenirs-and-old-furniture shop. A great admirer of yours, she was also quite a confidante. Sharp, lively and funny, sometimes kindly and really very malicious as well, she was an assiduous

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Grand Man: Memories of Norman Douglas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vii
  • Author's Note ix
  • Chronology of Norman Douglas 1868-1952 xi
  • Books by Norman Douglas xviii
  • I - Essay on Douglas 1
  • 1 - Of His Ways and Character 3
  • 2 - Douglas and Italy 20
  • 3 - Some Thoughts on His Writing 31
  • II - Letter to Norman 57
  • 1 - Earlier Memories 59
  • 2 - The Tunisian Journey 112
  • 3 - Wartime and After 153
  • III - Appreciations By Several Friends 229
  • 1 - 1868-1952* 231
  • 2 - "Uncle Norman" 236
  • 3 - Letter About Norman Douglas From Charles Duff 243
  • 4 - Douglas on Capri 248
  • 5 - A Day 254
  • IV - Bibliographical Note 265
  • V - His Books 273
  • Index 309
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