Sciences in Communist China: A Symposium Presented at the New York Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, December 26-27, 1960

By Sidney H. Gould | Go to book overview

Medicine and Public Health

WILLIAM Y. CHEN, United States Public Health Service, Washington, D. C.

Since China is a great country with a population of over 600,000,000 and a territory as big as the United States, her accomplishments in medicine and public health during the last ten years are worthy of study. Much attention has been paid to public health and medicine in an effort to prevent disease and promote health, to cope with the demand of national industrialization and reconstruction, and thus increase productivity. Since public health practice is closely related to the political system and governmental structures, it serves as an indirect reflection of the political and socio-economic status of present-day China, as well as an indication of actual achievements in the field.

The main sources of information for the preparation of this paper are the various Chinese medical and public health journals published both in Chinese and English during the past ten years. The Chinese Medical Journal of the Chinese Medical Association has a complete English edition. Many other medical journals of different specialities have printed English abstracts. Scattered articles of English translations from original Chinese medical publications have been published by the United States Department of Commerce in the past two years, and are valuable for scientists who may be interested in articles in their own fields.

It is the primary intention of the author to make a critical evaluation of the achievements in medicine and public health in China during the past decade rather than to give a thorough review of the literature in these areas. Most Chinese and English publications published in China have been reviewed, as well as reports from non-Chinese sources. Besides this, achievements and new developments unfamiliar to the Western world and the

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