Sciences in Communist China: A Symposium Presented at the New York Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, December 26-27, 1960

By Sidney H. Gould | Go to book overview

Electrical Engineering

T. C. TSAO, Columbia University, New York City


Engineering in General

In attempting to appraise its engineering science, one finds that the Chinese Communist regime has effectively roused the engineers and scientists and has directed their activity toward technological development, rarely toward basic research, in support of economic expansion. They are regimented, geared with the mass of the people to an unprecedented speed of production. They have lived tip to the aims of speed, quantity, and economy in all engineering accomplishments. It is naturally difficult to obtain quality when the other three aims are emphasized. In electrical engineering, the Chinese have made good advances through their own efforts and with foreign assistance, particularly in the field of equipment manufacture. In electric power, it would be a spectacular engineering achievement if the Yangtze Valley hydro project, as planned, should be realized in the future. As for electric communication, their development of "Heath Kit" type carrier telephone units effectively serves the purpose of connecting the rural districts to the urban areas. Discussion of these phases of activity is based mostly on material contained in the articles in the References and the publications listed in Appendix III.


Objectives

A year after the Communists gained power on the mainland in 1949, they entered the Korean War and had to devote themselves to military undertakings and consolidation of defense. Not till 1953 did they launch the First Five-Year Plan ( 1953-1957) of economic reconstruction. Because of the Korean War, funds, per-

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