Education for Public Administration: Graduate Preparation in the Social Sciences at American Universities

By George A. Graham | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6 FACULTY

IN TRAINING for public administration responsibility for instruction falls heavily upon social scientists, especially those in economics and politics. As it has been suggested, social scientists, concerned with public affairs, are in a difficult position. A teacher must keep abreast of developments in his broad field. That is no easy task today, since the discerning scholar sees the ramifications of his subject and finds himself led continually to collateral studies that he might once have thought remote. The cumulative effect and the accelerating pace of research also complicate the problem of keeping up to date. At the same time one must go forward with intensive studies in an attempt to contribute to knowledge.

These traditional responsibilities are only part of the problem. For a decade or more events have been a shower of meteors crashing into academic fields and demanding attention. Where the humanist or the laboratory scientist finds in the daily press and the journals an escape from his work, the social scientist finds not escape, but simply more data related to acute social problems. There is literally no escape from his job for the conscientious scholar in the social studies today; it is with him all day, and he is a lucky man who does not find himself awake at night, considering not the stars and the handiwork of the Lord, but the Earth and what seem to be the miserable mistakes of men. In addition, the scholar has increasing demands upon his time for civic and public services; some he should accept, others he must accept, and not a few he is too unskillful to avoid. Mention of the mythical ivory tower, once a reproach, now arouses not animosity but amusement and regret in the mind of an academician.


STRENGTHENING THE SOCIAL SCIENCE FACULTY

A university is no better than its faculty, and most faculties are aware of their weakness, just as most scholars are conscious of their deficiencies. The success of training for public administration depends directly upon the strength of the faculty, particularly in the social sciences. The vitality, the activity, the reality of social science instruction and of research generally gauge the quality of the training. Hence, all elements

-90-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Education for Public Administration: Graduate Preparation in the Social Sciences at American Universities
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 368

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.