The Government and Misgovernment of London

By William A. Robson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X WHOLESALE FOOD MARKETS

The ownership and management of markets is one of the oldest and most widely recognised municipal functions. All over the world the provision of markets is regarded as one of the most essential tasks of a city council. In London this matter, like so many others of public concern, has been left to the vagaries of ancient privilege and private profit.1

In the year 1326 a royal charter was granted to the City Corporation confirming the members in their liberties, customs and rights to hold markets, and forbidding the holding of others within seven miles of the City boundaries. At that time, and for long afterwards, the citizens both lived and worked inside the square mile of the ancient City, and the effect of this monopoly was merely to prevent the establishment of rival markets under separate authority on the outskirts of London. With the passing of six hundred years since the reign of Edward III the situation has entirely changed; and the vast metropolis which has grown up around the City is now subjected to arrangements whereby most of the wholesale food markets are under the control of the 40,000 or so persons who nominally constitute the body of local government electors within the square mile.

The City Corporation owns and operates the Billingsgate fish market, Smithfield meat market, the Leadenhall market for poultry, game and eggs, the Islington market for cattle, sheep and horses, and the Spitalfields market for fruit and vegetables. Both the Islington and Spitalfields markets are situated outside the area of the City. The Corporation has always been extremely zealous to protect its charter privileges but on more than one occasion it was unable to resist an encroachment on its monopolistic powers. Charles II granted to the fourth Earl of Bedford the right to hold a fruit and vegetable market at Covent Garden and this remained a

____________________
1
A good account of London markets in the 19th century is contained in Sir G. Laurence Gomme: London in the Reign of Victoria, pp. 94-125.

-243-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Government and Misgovernment of London
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 522

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.