The Government and Misgovernment of London

By William A. Robson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII A NEW RELATIONSHIP

The mutual relations between the major and minor authorities in the London Region should be conceived in terms differing fundamentally from anything which now exists either in the metropolis or elsewhere. Over a wide range of functions the local authorities must be subject to over-all control by the Greater London Council. Their scope will be enlarged and their independence reduced.

For the convenience of the reader, the functions to be administered by the local authorities under the general supervision of the regional organ is again stated. The list is broadly as follows, though no attempt has been made to make it exhaustive. It comprises: public libraries, the protection of children, the Small Dwellings Acquisition Act, the ambulance service, the operation of ferries diseases of animals, inspection of nursing homes, surveys for overcrowding, the provision of small holdings, licensing and inspection of petroleum, enforcement of the Shops Acts, protection of wild birds, registration of births, deaths and marriages, registration of electors, adulteration of food and drugs, registration of vendors of poison, the humane slaughter of animals, provision of mortuaries, cemeteries and crematoria, parking places, the construction, maintenance and improvement of local streets, the cleansing and lighting of highways, the provision of baths and wash- houses, inspection of dairies, cowsheds and milkshops, the regulation of ice cream vendors, provision of disinfecting stations, notification and prevention of infectious disease (apart from the provision of hospital accommodation), the authorisation of offensive trades, the inspection of weights and measures, removal (but not disposal) of refuse, the licensing and inspection of slaughterhouses, massage establishments and common lodging-houses, the treatment of tuberculosis in dispensaries (but not in hospitals or sanitoria), vaccination, the clearance of small unhealthy areas, the regulation of buildings, and a

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