Prohibition's Second Failure: The Quest for a Rational and Humane Drug Policy

By Theodore R. Vallance | Go to book overview

it, right? Wrong! The Bill of Rights is the backbone of every individual liberty that we have enjoyed these many years, and to allow any one of those rights to be violated and eroded for any cause, however virtuous that cause might seem, is to risk a loss of liberty for everyone. In the civil liberties arena, the war on drugs has lived up to the assertion that it is not so much a war on drugs as a war on people and that as in all wars many of the casualties are blameless victims and the basic rights of everyone.


SUMMARY

The judgment of the success or failure of any policy or program derives from the standards set for it. American policy on illicit drugs seems to be having success if measured against arrests, convictions, imprisonments, seizures, or property forfeitures as prescribed and permitted under the law. Such measures as these, however, are indicators of activity directed at a problem rather than of how the problem itself--in terms of public health and safety--is being changed. When measured against actual effects on public health, the successes seem less grand but are probably coming about. Efforts to prevent the use of illicit drugs are reflected in declines in reported drug use, in drugs mentioned in connection with hospital emergency room episodes, and in rises in the perception of drug use as dangerous; these are all moves in the right direction, even taking into account errors of sampling and measurement and the tendency of drug warriors to exaggerate their successes. Treatment efforts are producing modest but steady retrievals of drug abusers from the worst effects of abuse and are well worth the return on public investment.

On other measures, drug policy does not seem to be doing as well. Drug-related arrests continue apace; drug availability remains high and prices low; inner city streets remain hazardous; relations with drug-supplying countries are, if changing at all, changing for the worse; and civil liberties of Americans continue to erode as the enthusiasm of the drug warriors and the tolerance of spectators rise.

Where and how do we go from here? In the next chapter, we will take the assumption that the illegal status of marijuana, heroin, cocaine, and their derivatives will continue in effect. Then we ask, What can be done to beef up the war on drugs and what would be the likely consequences of staying tough in the criminal orientation?

-62-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Prohibition's Second Failure: The Quest for a Rational and Humane Drug Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter 1 Defining Today's Drug Problem in the United States 1
  • Conclusion 25
  • Chapter 2 Documenting the Costs of the Drug Problem 27
  • Summary 46
  • Chapter 3 How Effective and How Good a Bargain is Current Policy? 47
  • Summary 62
  • Chapter 4 Policy Options Within the Criminalization Context 63
  • Summary 77
  • Chapter 5 What Choices Do We Have? 81
  • Summary and Conclusion 99
  • Chapter 6 Toward a New Policy 101
  • Chapter 7 Getting There from Here 123
  • Appendix A Federal Drug Laws 135
  • Appendix B Reform-Oriented Organizations 141
  • Appendix C Studies by Special Committees, Councils, and Commissions 144
  • Notes 153
  • Sources 159
  • Index 169
  • About the Author 175
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 180

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.