Begging the Question: Circular Reasoning as a Tactic of Argumentation

By Douglas N. Walton | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Research for this work was supported by a Killam Research Fellowship from the Canada Council, a Fellowship from the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study (NIAS) in the Humanities and Social Sciences, and a Research Grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. The Dean of Arts and Sciences at the University of Winnipeg, Mike McIntyre, should also be acknowledged for his help in making arrangements that enabled the author to spend five months at NIAS in 1987-1988. During this period at NIAS, numerous discussions on the subjects of dialogue theory and fallacies with Erik Krabbe turned out to be helpful when, later, the present project was taken up.

Chapter two is based on the author's previously published article, "Burden of Proof," Argumentation 2 ( 1988): 233-54, revised and supplemented to fit the purposes of this book. Grateful acknowledgment is given to the editors of Argumentation for their permission to use this material.

Thanks are due to Frans van Eemeren and Rob Grootendorst, whose conversations and writings on the subject of argumentation have had a powerful and constructive influence on the formation of the ideas developed in this book. Discussions of linked and convergent arguments with John Hoaglund and Michael Schmidt, at the Conference on Critical Thinking at Newport News in April 1988, turned out to provide important motivation and insights for development of the theory of argument reconstruction advanced in chapter three.

Among the many others who have contributed to this book through their conversations or writings, I would especially like to thank Lynn Batten, Charles Harper, John Biro, David Sanford, John Woods, Trudy Govier, Henry W. Johnstone, Jr., Michel Meyer, Jaakko Hintikka, and Nicholas Rescher. Clearly, the work in this book has also been greatly influenced and advanced by the work of the late Charles Hamblin, whom the author remembers with great respect and warmth as a kindly and helpful senior colleague.

My deepest thanks to Amy Merrett for the word processing of this manuscript through its various stages.

-xi-

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Begging the Question: Circular Reasoning as a Tactic of Argumentation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Philosophy ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Note xv
  • 1 - Origins, Preconceptions, and Problems 1
  • Notes 33
  • 2 - Contexts of Dialogue 35
  • Notes 85
  • 3 - Argument Diagramming 87
  • Notes 123
  • 4 - Shorter Case Studies 125
  • Notes 180
  • 5 - Longer Case Studies 183
  • Notes 212
  • 6 - Fallacies, Faults, Blunders, and Errors 215
  • Notes 246
  • 7 - Revising the Textbooks 249
  • Notes 283
  • 8 - A Theory of Begging the Question 285
  • Notes 325
  • Bibliography 327
  • Index 335
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