Dickens and Thackeray: Punishment and Forgiveness

By John R. Reed | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Some of the contents of this study appeared elsewhere in different form. Material from chapter 2 appeared in "Learning to Punish: Victorian Children's Literature," Bucknell Review: Culture and Education in Victorian England, ed. Patrick Scott and Pauline Fletcher (Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press, 1990), 99-107. Material on Dickens appeared in "Authorized Punishment in Dickens's Fiction," Studies in the Novel, 24, No. 2 (Summer 1992), 112-30. And general materials appeared in "Paying Up: The Last Judgment and Forgiveness of Debt," Victorian Literature and Culture, 20, ed. John Maynard and Adrienne Auslander Munich ( New York: AMS Press, 1993). 55-68.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dickens and Thackeray: Punishment and Forgiveness
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Preface xi
  • Notes xvi
  • Part One The Context 1
  • ONE Attitudes Toward Punishment and Forgiveness in Moral Texts of the Victorian Period 3
  • TWO Education 30
  • THREE Legal Punishment 45
  • Part Two Dickens 63
  • FOUR Early Dickens 65
  • FIVE Oliver Twist 76
  • SIX Nicholas Nickleby 90
  • SEVEN The Old Curiosity Shop 107
  • EIGHT Barnaby Rudge 122
  • NINE Martin Chuzzlewit 134
  • TEN Dickens' Christmas Narratives 154
  • ELEVEN Dombey and Son 169
  • TWELVE David Copperfield 187
  • THIRTEEN Bleak House 207
  • FOURTEEN Hard Times 219
  • FIFTEEN Little Dorrit 234
  • SIXTEEN A Tale of Two Cities 257
  • SEVENTEEN Great Expectations 270
  • EIGHTEEN Our Mutual Friend 289
  • Part Three 305
  • NINETEEN Early Tackeray 307
  • TWENTY Vanity Fair 329
  • notes 350
  • TWENTY-ONE Pendennis 353
  • TWENTY-TWO Henry Esmond 377
  • TWENTY-THREE The Newcomes 400
  • TWENTY-FOUR The Virginians 423
  • TWENTY-FIVE The Adventures of Philip 442
  • TWENTY-SIX Roundabout Papers and Denis Duval 461
  • Conclusion 470
  • Notes 480
  • Bibliography 482
  • Index 497
  • A Note About the Author 505
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 512

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.