The Christian's ABC: Catechisms and Catechizing in England C.1530-1740

By Ian Green | Go to book overview

The Lord's Prayer

THE Lord's Prayer was not only the shortest but also probably the most frequently reproduced of the staple formulae of early modern English catechizing. It was short enough, and deemed sufficiently important, to be inscribed or printed on hornbooks, abecedaries, and battledores; used as an exercise in handwriting, and embroidered on samplers; and, together with the Apostles' Creed and the Ten Commandments, painted on boards or directly onto the walls of many, perhaps most, early modern churches.1 As a prayer, it was also repeated in the regular morning and evening services of the church and in holy communion, and in the rites of passage and the churching of women; and it was almost certainly used regularly in school prayers and in those households which held domestic worship.2 It would be surprising therefore if a high proportion of children and adults in Elizabethan and Stuart times had not at some stage been taught the English version of the Lord's Prayer or grown familiar with it through some other means, just as many of their predecessors in England or peer groups in contemporary Catholic states had learnt the Paternoster. Many authors of short or medium-length catechisms, including a few in our sample, did not even bother to include the full text of the Lord's Prayer. The great majority of catechists were, however, very anxious that their charges should understand what this prayer meant and how it should be used, and so most forms contain a few questions and answers or a few pages (according to size) on the purpose of prayer in general and the Lord's Prayer in particular.

To pray was to call on God, said a wide variety of the authors in our sample,3 though a few used more evocative terms in their initial definitions: 'a familiar speech with God', 'a pouring out of the soul before the Lord', a 'humble, hearty and holy

____________________
1
A. W. Tuer, The History of the Horn Book ( 2 vols.; 1896); V. E. Neuberg, Popular Education in Eighteenth Century England ( 1971), 58-9; A. Colby, Samplers Yesterday and Today ( 1964), 106, 112, 170; A. Sebba , Samplers: Five Centuries of a Gentle Craft ( 1979), 52-5; and on ABCs and Commandment boards, see above, pp. 172-8, 253. I propose to return to this subject in more detail in Religious Instruction in Early Modern England.
2
Brightman, English Rite, i. 132-3, 146-7, 156-7, 162-3; ii. 705-7, 743-5, 872-3, 882-3. Relatively little is known about the content as opposed to the existence of school and domestic devotions, but on the use of the Prayer Book catechism (which included the Lord's Prayer) in both locations, see Ch. 4 above.
3
Calvin, Catechisme, 92; Egerton, 'Briefe method', 13; Cartwright, 'Catechisme', sig. Aa8r; Ball, Catechisme, 76; Nicholes, Catechisme, 45; Marshall, Catechism, 32; Wake, Principles, 128-9.

-479-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Christian's ABC: Catechisms and Catechizing in England C.1530-1740
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 767

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.