Slavery and Abolition in the Ottoman Middle East

By Ehud R. Toledano | Go to book overview

FIVE
Discourses on Ottoman and Ottoman-Arab Slavery

THE SCHOLARLY STUDY of the history of slavery in Ottoman society--and in Muslim societies as a whole--is characterized by a deatoning silence, which is only seldom broken by lone voices. Although scattered works by individual scholars have been published in recent years,1 a sustained program of research with a concomitant

____________________
1
Thanks to the efforts of Joseph C. Miller, we possess an excellent bibliography of such works in his "Muslim Slavery and Slaving: A Bibliography", in Savage, The Human Commodity, pp. 249-71. For the most pertinent to our topic see, in order of publication, Baer, "Slavery and Its Abolition"; Muhammad Ali, The British, the Slave Trade, and Slavery in the Sudan; Borge Fredriksen, "Slavery and Its Abolition in Nineteenth-Century Egypt" ( Ph.D. diss., University of Bergen, 1977); Alan Fisher, "The Sale of Slaves in the Ottoman Empire: Markets and State Taxes on Slave Sales", Boğaziçi Üniversitesi Dergisi 6 ( 1978): 149-74; Halil İnalcık, "Servile Labor in the Ottoman Empire", in The Mutual Effects of the Islamic and Judeo-Christian Worlds: The East European Pattern, ed. A. Ascher, T. Halasi-Kun, and Bela Kiraly ( New York, 1979); Halil Sahillioğlu , "Onbeşinci Yüzyılın Sonu ile Onaltıncı Yüzyılın Başnda Bursa'da Kölelerin Sosyal ve Ekonomik Hayattaki Yeri", ODTÜ Gelişme Dergisi, 1979-80 Özel Sayısı, pp. 67-138 (an English version of this paper was presented at a conference on the economic and social history of the Islamic Middle East, 700- 1900, held at Princeton in 1974; the papers were published by Abraham L. Udovich in 1981, but this one was not included); Joseph Gaston, L'esclavage en Tunisie ( Tunis, 1980); Hans Müller, Die Kunst des Sklavenkaufs nach arabischen, persischen, und türkischen Ratgeben vom 10. bis zum 18. Jahrhundert ( Freiburg, 1980); Alan Fisher, "Chattel Slavery in the Ottoman Empire", Slavery and Abolition 1 ( 1980): 25-45; Patricia Crone, Slaves on Horses: TheEvolution of the Islamic Polity

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Slavery and Abolition in the Ottoman Middle East
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 185

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.