concern, an effect that indirectly and in the long run may cost more lives than are saved by responding expediently. But here we are in the area of almost complete speculation, where little in the way of evidence or argument counteracts individual prejudice.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I express appreciation to Robert Ball, Nora Bell, Nathan Crystal, Patricia Conway, Linda Kettinger, Susan Lake, Robert Post, Bosko Postic, Frederic Reamer, Laurence Thomas, and Deborah Valentine for valuable discussions and resource materials that helped me develop an understanding of issues related to AIDS. Frederic Reamer has been an ideal editor, offering wise comments and constructively prodding me on numerous issues that arose in the myriad versions of this paper. The paper owes much to his care and commitment to making it the most valuable contribution it can be. I also thank Sara Schechter-Schoeman, Miriam Schoeman, and Dmitri Schoeman for a very helpful discussion on issues of AIDS and health insurance.


NOTES
1.
United States v. Sergeant Nathaniel Johnson, Jr. upholds Sergeant Johnson's conviction for aggravated assault for attempting to engage in anal sex while knowing his condition to be HIV positive--making his semen deadly.
2.
For a collection of much of the best writing on privacy along with a philosophical overview of this literature, see Schoeman ( 1984a). For a review of the philosophical dimension of central privacy issues, see Schoeman ( 1984c).
3.
There is an even narrower conception, one that limits the range of privacy to personal information that is "undocumented."
4.
One criterion of the difference between the narrow and the wide privacy norms can be phrased in terms of the distinction between a role and a relationship. While a role is relatively limited in the range of responses thought appropriate and the ends to be achieved, a relationship is treated as more flexible on both counts. Our standing as a parent is role governed insofar as we owe our children certain attitudes almost independently of how they behave; our standing as a spouse is much more responsive to the actual behavior of the partner ( Greenhouse 1986).
5.
I am indebted to Robert Post for suggesting that I address this question.
6.
I am indebted to Nathan Crystal and Robert Post for coaching me on the intricacies of the lawyer-client confidentiality privilege.
7.
There are, of course, jobs (the pope and the president are examples) for which it is important to be a certain kind of person in addition to having certain skills available when at work.
8.
Regarding education as ineffective in reducing risk of HIV transmission to a "tolerable" level is not a reason to abandon educational efforts. As Nora Bell argues in her paper in this volume, education about significant health risks is important in

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AIDS & Ethics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Contributors xv
  • 1. Aids: the Relevance of Ethics 1
  • Note 22
  • References 23
  • 2. Aids, Public Health, and Civil Liberties: Consensus and Conflict in Policy 26
  • References 47
  • 3. Mandatory HIV Screening and Testing 50
  • References 73
  • 4. Aids and the Ethics of Human Subjects Research 77
  • Acknowledgments 101
  • References 102
  • 5. Aids and the Crisis of Health Insurance 105
  • References 124
  • 6. Ethical Issues in Aids Education 128
  • Acknowledgments 151
  • Notes 151
  • References 153
  • 7. Ethics and Militant Aids Activism 155
  • Notes 186
  • References 186
  • 8. Aids and the Physician-Patient Relationship 188
  • Notes 211
  • References 213
  • 9. Aids and the Obligations of Health Care Professionals 215
  • References 236
  • 10. Aids and Privacy 240
  • Acknowledgments 272
  • Notes 272
  • References 274
  • 11. Aids and the Law 277
  • References 305
  • SUGGESTED READINGS 306
  • Index 311
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