The Feminist Encyclopedia of German Literature

By Friederike Eigler; Susanne Kord | Go to book overview

K

Kreis von Münster (1770-1806). This refers to a group of writers, theologians, and pedagogues in predominantly Catholic Münster who took part in the discussion of philosophical ideas, literary trends, and educational reform between c. 1770 and 1806 (although the Kreis is often mentioned as a group until c. 1826). The leading members of the group included its founder, Minister Franz Freiherr von Fürstenberg, Adelheid Amalia von Schmettau von Gallitzin, Friedrich Leopold Graf zu Stolberg-Stolberg, Bernard Heinrich Overberg, and Anton Matthias Sprickmann.

The history of the Kreis falls into two main periods. The first, extending from 1770 to 1788, centers around Fürstenberg; the second centers around Gallitzin from 1779 until her death in 1806. The later period was marked by a strong Catholic orientation, since Gallitzin dedicated herself to the Roman Catholic faith in 1786, and Stolberg converted to Catholicism in 1800. After Gallitzin joined the circle, the group was often known as the Gallitzin-Kreis.

Gallitzin was well educated in several branches of philosophy and was known for her outstanding ability as a mathematician. Through her correspondence and her many personal acquaintances, she greatly facilitated the exchange of ideas between this circle and various other centers of critical and creative literary and philosophical activity in Germany ( Weimarer Kreis; Göttinger Hainbund). She corresponded extensively with her former teacher, the Dutch philosopher Frans Hemsterhuis, and collaborated with him on at least one of his major literary essays. She also corresponded with, among others, Matthias Claudius, Johann Gottfried Herder, Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi, and Johann Wolfgang Goethe.

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The Feminist Encyclopedia of German Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A 1
  • B 37
  • C 61
  • D 83
  • E 105
  • F 139
  • G 195
  • H 229
  • I 253
  • J 263
  • K 271
  • L 275
  • M 293
  • N 345
  • O 375
  • P 383
  • Q 429
  • R 431
  • S 465
  • T 515
  • U 531
  • V 537
  • W 553
  • Y 579
  • Z 581
  • Appendix of Names 587
  • Index 637
  • Contributors 673
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