Apache Voices: Their Stories of Survival as Told to Eve Ball

By Eve Ball; Sherry Robinson | Go to book overview

FIFTEEN Bosque Redondo

From inhumanity can come heroism, as the Mescaleros proved. In 1863, the Army began one of its most ill-conceived and cruel initiatives--the settlement of Mescalero Apaches and their enemies, the Navajos, at Bosque Redondo. Much has been written about the Navajo Long Walk. Less known is the Mescalero experience.

Kit Carson arrived at Fort Stanton in the fall of 1862 with orders from General James H. Carleton to kill all the Mescalero men whenever and wherever you can find them." If they asked for peace, the chiefs and twenty principal men were to come to Santa Fe for a talk. Major William McCleave, with two companies of the California Volunteers, pursued 500 Mescaleros into Dog Canyon and fought 100 warriors on 11 October 1862. The survivors asked Kit Carson for protection and he sent the leaders to Santa Fe. 1 Captain Thomas Roberts, with two companies, went south by Hueco Tanks and engaged another group, which may have been Magoosh's Lipan Apaches. 2 In early 1863 Carleton sent the Mescaleros to a reservation just established at Fort Sumner. 3

"I was a boy when they moved the Mescaleros from their homeland on the Bonito to the bosque near Fort Sumner," said Big Mouth. "I was big enough to ride a horse in 1863. My people had been hunting with bows and arrows. The soldiers spied their camp and there was a big fight. They whipped the soldiers for a while. But how could they fight long against longrange guns with only rocks, bows, and arrows? 4

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Apache Voices: Their Stories of Survival as Told to Eve Ball
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page III
  • Contents VII
  • Acknowledgments IX
  • Introduction XI
  • Part 1. The Warm Springs, Chiricahuas, and Nednhis 1
  • One Lozen 3
  • Two Tres Castillos 17
  • Three Captives 27
  • Four Geronimo and the Arroyo Fight 35
  • Five Streeter 45
  • Six Geronimo's Surrender 49
  • Seven Geronimo and Naiche 55
  • Eight the Impostors 61
  • Nine Eskiminzin 65
  • Ten the Apache Kid 79
  • Eleven Massai 87
  • Twelve Gordo and Juh 101
  • Thirteen Gold and Treasure 109
  • Part II. The Mescaleros and Lipans 113
  • Fourteen Cadette 115
  • Fifteen Bosque Redondo 121
  • Sixteen the Mescalero Reservation 125
  • Seventeen the Apaches and Comanches 131
  • Eighteen Comanche Stories 139
  • Nineteen Victorio and the Mescaleros 145
  • Twenty the Battle of Round Mountain 153
  • Twenty One Billy the Kid 159
  • Part III. The Apache Way 163
  • Twenty Two the Apache General Store 165
  • Twenty Three the Apache Pharmacy 177
  • Twenty Four Medicine Men and Women 181
  • Twenty Five Weapons and Warfare 187
  • Twenty Six Bear Tales and Other Animal Stories 195
  • Part IV. Eve Ball 201
  • Twenty Seven Eve Ball 203
  • Notes 221
  • Bibliography 255
  • Index 261
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