Apache Voices: Their Stories of Survival as Told to Eve Ball

By Eve Ball; Sherry Robinson | Go to book overview

TWENTY SEVEN Eve Ball

Talking to survivors of an event to get their stories is a basic far writers today. But when Eve Ball began talking to Apaches living on the Mescalero Reservation, the legitimacy--and popularity- of oral history was decades away, and Indian people were still, in the eyes of the dominant society, second-class citizens.

She once said, "If nothing else is said about me, I want people to know of my long struggle to get my books published.... Ph.D.s never accepted the intrinsic value of oral history until the last few years. Now that it has come of age, most of the old ones who experienced the history are gone."1

Considering her contributions and her importance among Western historians, I was surprised at how sketchy the accounts are of Eve Ball's life. Busy and modest, she may not have considered herself a fitting subject to write or talk about. Eve deserves a book about her life, a task I'll leave to writers who knew her. However, a voluminous correspondence with fellow historians and friends reveals a generous, caring, and energetic woman and a writer who was passionate about making history accessible and readable for everyone.

Katherine Evelyn Daly was born 14 March 1890, in Clarksville, Tennessee. 2 The family moved to a cattle ranch in Kansas when she was a toddler. Her mother, Gazelle Gibbs Daly, was the first woman to practice medicine in Kansas and instilled in her daughter a sense of independence and the value of education. 3

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Apache Voices: Their Stories of Survival as Told to Eve Ball
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page III
  • Contents VII
  • Acknowledgments IX
  • Introduction XI
  • Part 1. The Warm Springs, Chiricahuas, and Nednhis 1
  • One Lozen 3
  • Two Tres Castillos 17
  • Three Captives 27
  • Four Geronimo and the Arroyo Fight 35
  • Five Streeter 45
  • Six Geronimo's Surrender 49
  • Seven Geronimo and Naiche 55
  • Eight the Impostors 61
  • Nine Eskiminzin 65
  • Ten the Apache Kid 79
  • Eleven Massai 87
  • Twelve Gordo and Juh 101
  • Thirteen Gold and Treasure 109
  • Part II. The Mescaleros and Lipans 113
  • Fourteen Cadette 115
  • Fifteen Bosque Redondo 121
  • Sixteen the Mescalero Reservation 125
  • Seventeen the Apaches and Comanches 131
  • Eighteen Comanche Stories 139
  • Nineteen Victorio and the Mescaleros 145
  • Twenty the Battle of Round Mountain 153
  • Twenty One Billy the Kid 159
  • Part III. The Apache Way 163
  • Twenty Two the Apache General Store 165
  • Twenty Three the Apache Pharmacy 177
  • Twenty Four Medicine Men and Women 181
  • Twenty Five Weapons and Warfare 187
  • Twenty Six Bear Tales and Other Animal Stories 195
  • Part IV. Eve Ball 201
  • Twenty Seven Eve Ball 203
  • Notes 221
  • Bibliography 255
  • Index 261
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