Nicaragua's Other Revolution: Religious Faith and Political Struggle

By Michael Dodson; Laura Nuzzi O'Shaughnessy | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
1.
Three excellent sources on the history of U.S. intervention in the Caribbean Basin are Cole Blasier, The Hovering Giant: U.S. Response to Revolutionary Change in Latin America ( Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1976); James Chace, Endless War ( New York: Vintage Books, 1984); Walter LaFeber, Inevitable Revolutions: The United States in Central America ( New York: W. W. Norton, 1984).
2.
Blasier, The Hovering Giant, makes this very clear in the case of Mexico; see pp. 64-68, 101-28. For the Cuban case see Edward González, Cuba Under Castro: The Limits of Charisma ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1974), esp. pp. 27-76. On Nicaragua see John A. Booth, The End and the Beginning: The Nicaraguan Revolution ( Boulder: Westview Press, 1982), esp. pp. 41-46, 137-52.
3.
For an interesting comparison of the revolutionary approaches of Cuba and Nicaragua, see Max Azicri, "A Cuban Perspective on the Nicaraguan Revolution," in Nicaragua in Revolution, ed. Thomas W. Walker ( New York: Praeger, 1982), pp. 345-73. Azicri stresses the more pluralistic nature of the Nicaraguan Revolution.
4.
Daniel Ortega, "Nicaragua's View of Nicaragua," in Nicaragua: Unfinished Revolution, ed. Peter Rosset and John Vandemeer ( New York: Grove Press, 1986), p. 5.
6.
A penetrating and illuminating discussion of the historical origins and ideological character of Sandinismo is Donald C. Hodges, Intellectual Foundations of the Nicaraguan Revolution ( Austin: University of Texas Press, 1986). Hodges demonstrates that Sandinismo is an eclectic ideology that incorporates liberal elements in its commitment to human rights, religious elements in its active collaboration with revolutionary Christians, and Marxist elements in its determination to end class-based exploitation. From Sandino himself Sandinismo has inherited an anarchist impulse that coexists in creative tension with its Marxist principles. Hodges's analysis makes it clear that the Nicaraguan Revolution is different in important ways from the Cuban Revolution. See esp. chap. 8 and the conclusion.
7.
E. Bradford Burns, At War in Nicaragua: The Reagan Doctrine and the Politics of Nostalgia ( New York: Harper and Row, 1987), p. 20.
8.
Many main-line Protestant denominations in the United States have adopted resolutions opposing U.S. intervention in Nicaragua. In support of

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