Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

AUSTRO-HUNGARIAN REPLY TO PRESIDENT WILSON'S PEACE NOTE1 December 26, 1916

In reply to the aide memoire communicated on the 22d instant by his Excellency the American Ambassador, containing the proposals of the President of the United States of America for an exchange of views among the Powers at present at war for the eventual establishment of peace, the Imperial and Royal Government desires particularly to point out that in considering the noble proposal of the President it is guided by the same spirit of amity and complaisance as finds expression therein.

The President desires to establish a basis for a lasting peace without wishing to indicate the ways and means. The Imperial and Royal Government considers a direct exchange of views among the belligerents to be the most suitable way of attaining this end. Adverting to its declaration of the 12th instant, in which it announced its readiness to enter into peace negotiations, it now has the honor to propose that representatives of the belligerent Powers convene at an early date at some place on neutral ground.

The Imperial and Royal Government likewise concurs in the opinion of the President that only after the termination of the present war will it be possible to undertake the great and desirable work of the prevention of future wars. At an appropriate time it will be willing to cooperate with the United States of America for the realization of this noble aim.


TURKISH REPLY TO PRESIDENT WILSON2
December 26, 1916

MR. AMBASSADOR: In reply to the note which your Excellency was pleased to deliver to me under date of the twenty-third instant, number 2107, containing certain suggestions of the President of the United States, I have the honor to communicate to your Excellency the following:

The generous initiative of the President, tending to create bases

____________________
1
4 Dip. Corr, 328.
2
4 Dip. Corr.,327.

-23-

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