Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

SCANDINAVIAN PEACE NOTE1
December 29, 1916

It is with the keenest interest that the Government of the King learned the proposition just made by the President of the United States with a view to facilitating measures tending to the establishment of lasting peace while desiring to avoid any interference that might hurt legitimate feelings. The Government of the King would consider itself remiss in its duty to its own people and the whole of mankind if it should fail to express its most profound sympathy with every effort that might contribute to bringing to an end the progressive accumulation of suffering and moral and physical losses. It indulges the hope that the initiative of President Wilson will end in a result worthy of the lofty spirit by which he was inspired.2


BULGARIAN REPLY TO PRESIDENT WILSON3
December 30, 1916

The generous initiative of the President of the United States tending to create bases for the restoration of peace, was cordially received and taken into consideration by the Royal Government in the same friendly spirit which is evidenced by the presidential communication. The President indicates the object he has at heart and leaves open the choice of the way leading to that object. The Royal Government considers a direct exchange of views to be the most efficacious way to attain the desired end. In accordance with its declaration of the 12th of December inst., which extends a hand for peace negotiations, it has the honor to propose an immediate meeting at one place of delegates of the belligerent Powers. The Royal Government shares the view that the great undertaking which consists in preventing future war

____________________
1

4 Dip. Corr., 331.

2
The Entente Governments replied to this note on January 17, referring to their replies to the German note and to President Wilson; cf. The Times, London, January 18, 1917, p. 9.
3

4 Dip. Corr., 333; also presented as a reply to the note of President Wilson.

-29-

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