Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

can only be initiated after the close of present conflict of nations. When that time comes, the Royal Government will be glad to cooperate with the United States of America and other neutral nations in that sublime endeavor.


DECLARATION OF PREMIER RADOSLAVOFF IN THE BULGARIAN SOBRANJE1
December 30, 1916

I can assure you that Bulgaria's work has been brought to a successful conclusion. To those who assert that we are asking too much I reply that we are no chauvinists, but that we are aware of the aspirations of the Bulgarian people. You know from the Royal manifesto issued when war was declared what Bulgarian aspirations are. I am not obliged to reply to each speaker individually.

. . . . . . . . . . .


SPANISH REPLY TO PRESIDENT WILSON'S PEACE NOTE2
December 30, 1916

His Majesty's Government has received through your embassy a copy of the note which the President of the United States has presented to the belligerent Powers, expressing the desire that an early opportunity should be sought for obtaining from all the nations now at war a declaration as to their intentions so far as regards the bases upon which the conflict might be terminated. This copy is accompanied by another note, signed by yourself, and dated December 22, in which your embassy, in accordance with the instructions of your Government, says, in the name of the President, that the moment seems to be opportune for action on the part of his Majesty's Government, and that it should, if it thinks fit, support the attitude adopted by the Government of the United States.

With regard to the reasonable desire manifested by the latter Gov-

____________________
1
The Times, London, January 2, 1917.
2
The New York Times Current History magazine, February, 1917, p. 792.

-30-

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