Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

REPLY OF BRAZIL TO PRESIDENT WILSON'S PEACE NOTE1
January 6, 1917

I am in possession of note No. 332, received at this Ministry on December 26, dated December 22 last, in which in pursuance of instructions received, you transcribe a note which the Government of the United States of America addressed to each one of the Powers now at war, relative to the desirability of the reestablishment of peace.

I did not fail to bring the text of the said note to the high attention of the President of the Republic, and I am authorized to say that the Government of Brazil, a hearty advocate of international peace and concord, is not indifferent to steps looking toward the reestablishment and stability of such peace and concord. These pacific sentiments, in which the whole Brazilian nation participates, place the Government in the happy situation of being able, without embarrassment to itself, and without lack of consideration toward others, to reserve the right to await the opportunity to cooperate or act in that sense in each instance, which may come under its examination, or which may involve its sovereign rights.

In these terms, the Brazilian Government has taken cognizance of the said note, and is thankful for the kind communication of its full text.


GREEK REPLY TO PRESIDENT WILSON2
January 8, 1917

The Royal Government acquainted itself with the most lively interest with the step which the President of the United States of America has just taken with a view to the termination of a long and cruel war that is raging among men. Very sensible to the communication that has been made to it, the Royal Government highly appreciates the generous impulse as well as the thoroughly humane and profoundly politic spirit which prompted the suggestion.

Coming from the learned statesman who presides over the destinies

____________________
1
4 Dip. Corr., 334. For replies of other States see, ibid., pp. 326 ( Gautemala), 329 ( Panama), 339 ( Uruguay), 343 ( Honduras), 344 ( Persia), 345 ( Peru).
2
4 Dip. Corr., 342.

-32-

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Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918
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