The Making and Remaking of Christian Doctrine: Essays in Honour of Maurice Wiles

By Sarah Coakley; David A. Pailin | Go to book overview
13.
Some defenders of the doctrine of the Incarnation have apparently assumed that what has to be vindicated is precisely something like an identity statement, and have produced accounts of the doctrine quite considerably removed from, say, the major medieval discussions of it. The most striking recent example is Morris 1986.
14.
E. A. Peterson celebrated Der Monotheismus als politisches Problem ( Peterson 1935) begins to do something like this. Recent years have seen several studies of Marian doctrine and eucharistic practice which have raised these sorts of question; an application of this method to Christology on a wide historical front, setting side by side the characteristic metaphors and visual images of a period with the language of doctrinal debate, would be of great significance.
15.
He may be contrasted in this respect with Dennis Nineham whose essay in The Myth of God Incarnate (Nineham 1977) and discussion of the wider issues of history and faith in The Use and Abuse of the Bible ( Nineham 1976) take for granted the radical historical inaccessibility of Jesus, and concentrate on elaborating a theology of the Church as carrier of an experience of God occasioned in some sense by Jesus, but not given specification by any particular facts about him. Wiles is sometimes quite close to such a position (for example, his paper of 1978 'In What Sense is Christianity a "Historical" Religion?' ( Wiles 1978) appears to imply this), but in practice (as in Wiles 1982) he continues to see the narrative of Jesus as having some kind of normativity for faith in a way which is not obviously entailed by Nineham's account.
16.
See Herbert McCabe discussion of The Myth of God Incarnate and subsequent correspondence with Wiles in his collection of essays and sermons God Matters (McCabe 1987), and in particular his statement on p. 71: 'It is in the contact with the person who is Jesus, in this personal communion between who he is and who I am, that his divinity is revealed in his humanity, not in any, as it were, clinical objective examination of him.'
17.
On the philosophical and theological problems of the assumption that the state of nature is a state of violent conflict, see most recently Milbank 1990: 278-325.

REFERENCES

Barth Karl ( 1933), The Epistle to the Romans (Eng. trans. of 6th edn. by E. C. Hoskyns), Oxford.

Hampson Daphne ( 1990), Theology and Feminism, Oxford.

Kant Immanuel ( 1933), Critique of Pure Reason, trans. Norman Kemp Smith , London.

-263-

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The Making and Remaking of Christian Doctrine: Essays in Honour of Maurice Wiles
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vi
  • List of Contributors viii
  • 1 - Divine Action and Hebrew Wisdom 1
  • Notes 11
  • References 12
  • 2 - Making and Remaking in the Ministry of the Church 13
  • 3 - Why Three? Some Further Reflections on the Origins of the Doctrine of the Trinity 29
  • Notes 50
  • References 53
  • 4 - Interpretation and Reinterpretation in Religion 57
  • Notes 71
  • References 72
  • 5 - Chalcedon and the New Testament 73
  • Notes 91
  • References 92
  • 6 - Reconstructing the Concept of God: De-reifying the Anthropomorphisms 95
  • VI 113
  • References 115
  • 7 - St Gregory the Theologian and St Maximus the Confessor: The Shaping of Tradition 117
  • Notes 129
  • References 129
  • 8 - Lex orandi: Heresy, Orthodoxy, and Popular Religion 131
  • References 140
  • 9 - The Theologian as Advocate 143
  • Notes 156
  • References 158
  • 10 - Doctrinal Development: Searching for Criteria 161
  • References 176
  • 11 - Revelation Revisited 177
  • References 191
  • 12 - A Priori Christology and Experience 193
  • References 211
  • 13 - The Supposedly Historical Basis of Theological Understanding 213
  • References 235
  • 14 - Doctrinal Criticism: Some Questions 239
  • Notes 261
  • References 263
  • 15 - Paideia and the Myth of Static Dogma 265
  • Edition's 283
  • Bibliography of Writings by Maurice Wiles 285
  • Index of Names 291
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