Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

PROCLAMATION BY KAISER WILHELM II TO THE GERMAN PEOPLE1
January 13, 1917

Our enemies have dropped the mask. After refusing with scorn and hypocritical words of love for peace and humanity our honest peace offer, they now, in their reply to the United States, have gone beyond that and admitted their lust for conquest, the baseness of which is further enhanced by their calumnious assertions. Their aim is the crushing of Germany, the dismemberment of the Powers allied with us, and the enslavement of the freedom of Europe and the seas, under the same yoke that Greece, with gnashing of teeth, is now enduring. But what they, in thirty months of the bloodiest fighting and unscrupulous economic war could not achieve, they will also in all the future not accomplish.

Our glorious victories and our iron strength of will, with which our fighting people at the front and at home have borne all hardships and distress, guarantee that also in the future our beloved fatherland has nothing to fear. Burning indignation and holy wrath will redouble the strength of every German man and woman, whether it is devoted to fighting, work, or suffering. We are ready for all sacrifices. The God who planted His glorious spirit of freedom in our brave people's heart will also give us and our loyal allies, tested in battle, full victory over all the enemy lust for power and rage for destruction.

WILHELM, I. R.


BRITISH SUPPLEMENT TO ENTENTE REPLY TO PRESIDENT WILSON2
January 13, 1917

SIR: In sending you a translation of the Allied note I desire to make the following observations, which you should bring to the notice of the United States Government.

I gather from the general tenor of the President's note that while

____________________
1
The Times, London, January 15, 1917.
24

Dip. Corr., 339; in the form of a communication from the Foreign Office to the British Ambassador in Washington.

-45-

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Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918
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