Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

tunity to renew to the Chargé d'Affaires the expression of his most perfect consideration.

"CZERNIN.

"To
Mr. Joseph Clark Grew,
Chargé d'Affaires of the United States of America
."

GREW.


PROCLAMATION OF THE RUSSIAN PROVISIONAL GOVERNMENT IN REFERENCE TO ITS WAR AIMS1
April 10, 1917

Having examined the military situation, the Russian Government in the name of duty and country, has decided to tell the people directly and openly the whole truth.

The régime which has now been overthrown left the defense of the country in a badly disorganized condition. By its culpable inaction and its inept measures it introduced disorganization into our finances, into provisioning and the transport and supply of munitions to the army. It weakened the whole of our economic organization.

The Provisional Government with the active cooperation of the whole nation will devote all its energy to repair the serious consequences of the old régime. The blood of many sons of the fatherland has been shed freely in the course of these two and a half long years of war, but the country still is capable of a powerful blow at the enemy, who occupies whole territories of our State and is now--in the days of the birth of Russian liberty--threatening us with a new and decisive thrust.

The defense, cost what it may, of our national patrimony, and the deliverance of the country from the enemy who invades our borders constitute the capital and the vital problems before our warriors who are defending the liberty of the people in close union with our allies.

The Government deems it to be its right duty to declare now that free Russia does not aim at the domination of other nations, at depriving them of their national patrimony, or at occupying by force foreign territory, but that its object is to establish a durable peace on a basis of the rights of nations to decide their own destiny.

____________________
1
Text in The New York Times, April 11, 1917, p. 4.

-95-

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