Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview
future has before us in the unhampered development of our strength, so that from all the blood and all the sacrifices, the empire and the people will rise again strong, independent, and unthreatened by enemies, a bulwark of peace and labor.
STATEMENT OF THE REORGANIZED RUSSIAN PROVISIONAL GOVERNMENT ON ITS POLICY WITH RESPECT TO WAR AIMS, THE ALLIANCE, AND A SEPARATE PEACE1
May 19, 1917
The Provisional Government, reorganized and reinforced by representatives of the Revolutionary Democracy, declares that it will energetically carry into effect the ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity, beneath the standards by which the great Russian Revolution came to birth. The Provisional Government is united as to the fundamental lines of its future action as follows:
First --In foreign policy the Provisional Government, rejecting, in concert with the entire people, all sorts of a separate peace, adopts openly as its aim the reestablishment of a general peace which shall not tend toward either dominion over other nations, the seizure of their national possessions, or violent usurpation of their territories--a peace with annexation or indemnity and based on the right of nations to decide their own affairs. In the firm conviction that the fall of the régime of czardom in Russia and the consolidation of the democratic principles of our internal and external policy will create in the Allied democracies new aspirations toward a stable peace and a brotherhood of nations, the Provisional Government will take steps toward bringing about an agreement with the Allies on a basis of the declaration of April 9.
Second --Convinced that the defeat of Russia and her allies would not only be a source of the greatest calamity to the people, but would postpone or make impossible the conclusion of a worldwide peace on the basis indicated above, the Provisional Government believes that the Russian revolutionary army will not suffer the German troops to destroy our western Allies and then throw themselves upon us with the full force of their arms. The development of the principles of
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1
Text in The New York Times, May 20, 1917, p. 1.

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Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918
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