Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

which creates a market for industry, which supplies the foundations for social progress, and which guarantees to our ships the doctrine of the free voyage and the right to enter ports and to take in coal all the world over, a peace of the widest economic and cultural development. a real peace.

This peace we can attain within these limits.

So long as our enemies confront us with demands which appear unacceptable to every single German, so long as our opponents want to interfere with frontier posts, so long as they demand that we shall yield a piece of German soil, so long as they pursue the idea of driving a wedge between the German people and its Emperor, so long shall we with folded arms refuse the hand of peace.

We wait, and can wait. Time is working for us.

Until our enemies perceive that they must reduce their claims so long must the cannon speak and the U-boats do their work.

Our peace will yet come.


STATEMENT OF FOREIGN MINISTER VON KUHLMANN IN THE REICHSTAG ON GERMAN PEACE TERMS1
October 9, 1917

...........

Gentlemen, a comparatively short time has elapsed since the foreign policy of the Empire was last discussed in detail in the budget committee. Today in plenary session of this House I need, therefore, make only a kind of epilogue to the statements made before the committee by the Chancellor and myself. The statements made by the government may be considered as common knowledge, they having been given full publicity.

The endeavors of the Holy See to bring about an exchange of views between the nations now fighting against one another have, so far as we are informed, not yet resulted in any considerable step forward since the reply of the Central Powers was sent. So far we can not say whether our adversaries will make up their minds eve

____________________
1

Text in The Times, London, October 11, 1917, p. 10.

-157-

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