Acknowledgments

This book has been germinating for a long time. The first seeds were planted at Wesleyan University in the mid-80s when a group of us -- mostly habitués of the Center for Humanities -- set about planning the formation of a cultural studies programme. Led by Betsy Traube, Dick Ohmann and Khachig Tololyan, our number included Sally Banes, Hazel Carby, Michael Denning, Len Tennenhouse, Nancy Armstrong, Christina Crosby, Alex Dupuy, Richard Stammelman, Richard Slotkin, Andy Szegedy-Maszak, and Richard Vann, among others. Our initial idea was to produce a statement explaining what cultural studies was to the rest of the campus. I thought that this would take about an afternoon. After a year, it still wasn't finished. For we quickly discovered that each of us had a different idea of what cultural studies was supposed to be. Even a visit from Stuart Hall didn't settle the matter. But the debate was informative for all of us.

My approach was to define cultural studies in terms of its object of enquiry, which I thought was obviously mass art. I don't think that anyone agreed with me. And in retrospect, I think that they were probably right. Nevertheless, I had a subject that intrigued me, and I gave up trying to define cultural studies and concentrated on mass art instead.

It was my great luck when I moved from Wesleyan to Cornell that popular culture was an abiding interest of the Society for Humanities there. It was as a fellow of the Society that I taught my first course in mass art. Under the auspices of Jonathan Culler and Dominic LaCapra, the Society enlisted a lively parade of speakers and fellows including David Bathrick, Rachel Bowlby, Laura Mulvey, Karal Ann Marling, Constance Penley, Richard Dyer, Andrew Ross, Linda Williams, and Alexander Doty. Especially pleasant were several conversations with Simon Frith, who gave me useful pointers on popular music, and great gossip. Others on the Cornell campus who offered me useful feedback on my writing were Kwame Anthony Appiah, Carl and Sally Ginet, Cynthia Baughman, Richard Moran, and Peter Lamarque, a visitor from Scotland at the time.

My first paper on mass art was presented at a symposium sponsored by the Volkswagen Stifung at the University of Wurzburg in 1991. There I benefited from thoughtful criticisms and suggestions from Gerhard Hoffman, Alfred Hornung, Herbert Grabes, Lothar Bredella, Hans Bertens, Malcolm Bradbury, Christopher Butler, Paul Levine, David Nye, Herb Blau, and Kathleen Woodward.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Philosophy of Mass Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Philosophical Resistance to Mass Art: The Majority Tradition 15
  • 2 - Philosophical Celebrations of Mass Art: The Minority Tradition 110
  • 3 - The Nature of Mass Art 172
  • 4 - Mass Art and the Emotions 245
  • 5 - Mass Art and Morality 291
  • 6 - Mass Art and Ideology 360
  • Envoi 413
  • Index 419
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 425

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.