Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

ROCLAMATION OF THE MILITARY REVOLUTIONARY COMMITTEE AFTER THE NOVEMBER REVOLUTION IN PETROGRAD1
November 7, 1917

TO THE ARMY COMMITTEES OF THE ACTIVE ARMY AND TO ALL COUNCILS OF WORKMEN AND SOLDIERS' DELEGATES AND TO THE GARRISON AND PROLETARIAT OF PETROGRAD:

We have deposed the Government of Kerensky which rose against the Revolution and the people. The change which resulted in the deposition of the Provisional Government was accomplished without bloodshed.

The Petrograd Council of Workmen and Soldiers' Delegates solemnly welcomes the accomplished change and proclaims the authority of the military Revolutionary Committee until the creation of a government by the Workmen and Soldiers' Delegates.'

Announcing this to the army at the front the Revolutionary Committee calls upon the revolutionary soldiers to watch closely the conduct of the men in command. Officers who do not join the accomplished revolution immediately and openly must be arrested at once as enemies.

The Petrograd Council of Workmen and Soldiers' Delegates considers this to be the program of the new authority:

First--the offer of an immediate democratic peace.

Second--The immediate handing over of large proprietary holdings of lands to the peasants.

Third--The transmission of all authority to the Council of Workmen and Soldiers' Delegates.

Fourth--The honest convocation of a constitutional assembly.

The national revolutionary army must not permit uncertain military detachments to leave the front for Petrograd; they should use persuasion, but where this fails they must oppose any such action on the part of these detachments by force without mercy.

The actual order must be read immediately to all military detachments in all arms. The suppression of this order from the rank and file by army organizations is equivalent to a great crime against the revolution and will be punished by all the strength of the revolutionary law.

____________________
1
Text in The New York Times November 9, 1917, p. 1 The revolution took place on November 7, N. S. ( October 25, O. S.).

-187-

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