Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

PROTEST OF THE ALLIED MILITARY MISSIONS IN RUSSIA TO THE RUSSIAN COMMANDER IN CHIEF AGAINST A SEPARATE PEACE1
November 27, 1917

YOUR EXCELLENCY: The undersigned Chief of the Allied National Military Missions accredited to the Russian General Staff have the honor to declare in conformity with precise indications received from their authorized representatives in Petrograd, that they protest most energetically to the Russian General Command against all violation of the conditions of the treaty of Sept. 5 (1914?) by which the Allies, including Russia, solemnly engaged themselves not to conclude an armistice separately, or to suspend military operations separately.

The undersigned Chief of the Military Missions of the Allies consider it their duty to inform the General Staff that any violation of the Treaty by Russia will have the most serious consequences.

The undersigned beg your Excellency to be so good as to acknowledge receipt of this communication in writing.


SPEECH OF CHANCELLOR MICHAELIS IN THE REICHSTAG ON WAR AIMS AND A POSSIBLE RUSSIAN PEACE2
November 29, 1917

The Russian Government sent out yesterday from the Tsarkoe Selo wireless station a telegram signed by the People's Commissioner for Foreign Affairs, M. Trotsky, and by the chairman of the Council of the People's Commissaries M. Lenin, addressed to the governments and the peoples of the belligerent countries. In this telegram it is proposed that negotiations concerning a truce and general peace be opened at an early date.

Gentlemen, I do not hesitate to declare that in the proposal of the Russian Government, so far as it is at present known, the debatable principle on which the opening of negotiations may be based can be

____________________
1
Text in The Times, London, November 30, 1917, p. 8.
2
Text in The New York Times Current History magazine, January, 1918, p. 108. Only portions of the speech are printed.

-191-

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Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918
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