Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

hitherto unknown in the annals of naval war. I do not think that we are likely to hear very much more from enemy lips of the "freedom of the seas."

Finally, under this head, there is the accusation that the peace which we have in view is to be a blind and a disguise for the continuance of the war under another name. In my judgment, and I hope in yours, no peace will be worth the name which, although it involved a suspension of hostilities and the laying down of arms, permitted or contemplated what I called the other day a "veiled war" to be carried on by other methods, but none the less in a belligerent spirit. I have asserted, and shall continue to assert, as strongly as any man, our rights to use all legitimate methods, economic as well as military, to secure our main purpose, and to bring about such a lasting and fruitful peace as the world needs. The position of the Allies in that matter is stated with perfect lucidity by President Wilson in his recent address, and I respectfully subscribe to and endorse the language which he has used. But when the object is accomplished "We shall be free," as he well and wisely says, "to base peace on generosity and justice to the exclusion of selfish claims to advantage even on the part of the victors."

A clean peace. That is what the people of this country and all the Allied peoples desire. And that it may be attained--nothing more, but nothing less--they are unflinching in their resolve and in their willingness to go on making necessary efforts and sacrifices.


ADDRESS OF PRIME MINISTER LLOYD-GEORGE ON WAR AIMS1
December 14, 1917

. . . . . . . . . . .

Recently a highly respected nobleman, who has rendered distinguished service to the State in many spheres, startled the nation by a letter which gave rise to very considerable apprehension on the part of those whose main anxiety is that this war should terminate in an upright and enduring peace and not in a humiliating surrender. I now understand that all our anxieties as to this epistle were ground-

____________________
1
Text in The Times, London, December 15, 1917, p. 7.

-210-

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