Official Statements of War Aims and Peace Proposals, December 1916 to November 1918

By James Brown Scott | Go to book overview

to Germany, proof which by its significance and weight is far superior to any expression of popular will.

The principles of economic relations proposed by the Russian delegation in connection with the above six clauses are approved wholly by the delegations of the allied Powers, who always have denied any economic restrictions and who see in the reestablishment of regulated economic relations, which are in accord with the interests of all people concerned, one of the most important conditions for bringing about friendly relations between the Powers now engaged in war.


REPLY OF BELGIUM TO THE PAPAL PEACE NOTE1
December 27, 1917

VERY HOLY FATHER: I have taken note, with lively sympathy and interest, of the message your Holiness was good enough to send to the heads of the belligerent countries the 1st of August, and have hastened to submit it to my Government, which has studied it with most serious and deferential attention. The result of that study has been recorded in a note which I am happy to communicate to your Holiness.

In associating myself with the wishes of the Holy See that a just and durable peace may promptly put an end to the evils from which humanity, and particularly the Belgian people, so rudely tried, are suffering, I beg your Holiness to believe in my final and respectful attachment.

(Signed) ALBERT.

The Royal Government, as soon as it received the message of your Holiness to the heads of the belligerents, hastened to reply, that it would study with the greatest deference the propositions the document set forth in such elevating language.

At the same time it desired particularly to express its lively and profound gratitude for the particular interest the Holy Father manifested in the Belgian Nation, and of which the document was new and precious proof.

____________________
1

Text furnished by the Belgian Official Information Service, Washington, D. C.

-223-

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